What Should You Do if They Don’t Call You Back After Job Interview?

April 7, 2012 | By More
Insurance Job Interview - No Response

Job interviews are always nerve racking, no matter the situation. And waiting for that phone call can be extremely nerve racking. This article discusses the steps to take after not receiving a phone call and how to remain professional.

Not getting a follow up call, as promised, happens more than you think. Candidates are sure that they are a shoe-in for the position, and expecting an offer, and then nothing. This is not only frustrating for the candidate, but reflects poorly on the company.

Expecting a call that doesn’t come

Cheryl feels confident that she aced the interview, and has followed up with a dynamite thank you letter. She was told a decision would be made before the end of the week, and is almost sure she will be getting an offer. That was Tuesday, and by Friday she is having doubts. There has been no call from the company.

Does this mean she isn’t going to get an offer? Should she call and ask, “What’s up?” Should she just hang by her nails over the weekend?

What to do?

Cheryl decides to consults her cousin, Gloria, who is an HR manager at another company. Gloria tells her that she should call the interviewer and find out where she stands. She advises her to wait until Tuesday to call. (Mondays are always bad)

The follow up phone call

On Tuesday morning, Cheryl is equipped with a script so she will be focused and confident when she makes her call. She gets a voice mail and leaves her message.

“Miss French, This is Cheryl Jones, we met last Tuesday when I interviewed for the position of Customer Service Rep. I’d like to inquire about the status of the position and whether I am still under consideration for the job. I would appreciate it if you would get back to me today. My number is 333-999-8888. Thank you for your time.”

Be persistent – not a pest

If you don’t get a return call as promised, call them and leave a message. Be prepared, professional, and courteous. Try to reach the person at least one to three times, explaining that you want the information before you consider other positions because this company would be your first choice. If you don’t get an answer, consider it a “No” answer. There is a fine line between being persistent and being a pest.

You may get lucky and get a “live” person when you call to find out your status. If you do have such luck, you can use this opportunity to ask for feedback on your interviewing effectiveness. Sometimes, not often, a person will spend some time and give you advice. If this happens, be grateful and learn from the experience.

Most employers are aware that candidates are anxious about the status of their acceptance, and will let them know in a timely manner. But, there are employers who do keep candidates waiting and wondering what happened, even though they said they would call by a certain date. Take this into consideration as information about the company’s practices and whether you would want to work for this company.

In the meantime, rather than sitting and waiting for that phone call that may never come, continue to work on your job search. It is never wise to “put all your eggs in one basket.”

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Category: Interview Questions

About the Author ()

Carole Martin is an expert on the subject of interviews. You could say that I am passionate about the subject - I eat, drink, and sleep the subject. I have interviewed thousands of people and have watched them make major mistakes and lose the job to someone else. Although I wanted to help them, I couldn't because I was on the other side of the desk. When I returned to grad school in 1993 to pursue my Master's degree, I made a decision to change what I did because I wanted to help people. I love having the ability of making a difference in people's lives.